drakontomalloi:

Franz von Stuck - Salome. 1906

drakontomalloi:

Franz von Stuck - Salome. 1906

goeyen:

"Salome" - Lucien Lеvy-Dhurmer

goeyen:

"Salome" - Lucien Lеvy-Dhurmer

hideback:

Gustave Moreau (French, 1826-1898)

Salome receives the head of John the Baptist as a reward for dancing for King Herod.

The Apparition in various versions, circa 1875

venusmilk:

Roberto FranzoniLa danza, c. 1914-1915

venusmilk:

Roberto Franzoni
La danza, c. 1914-1915

dovtalpaz:

Shade. Drawing based on my pal @yevglad photo. #horse #man #drawing #Turkey

dovtalpaz:

Shade. Drawing based on my pal @yevglad photo. #horse #man #drawing #Turkey


 Jim Morrison in his high school yearbook, 1961.

Jim Morrison in his high school yearbook, 1961.

My name is Barney Gumbel. I’m 40, I’m single, and I drink. There’s a line in `Othello’ about a drinker: `Now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast.’ That pretty well covers it. Don’t cry for me. I’m already dead.

mediadiversified:

The Tragedy Of Otello: A layperson’s view of racial politics in 21st Century opera


 by Daniel York
The English National Opera have recently announced that the role of Otello in their upcoming production of Verdi’s opera of the same name, which is based on Shakespeare’s Othello, will be played by the renowned Australian tenor, Stuart Skelton. Othello is of course Shakespeare’s famous (and in many ways infamous) “black” character. A “Moorish general”, sometimes described in the text as “tawny” but to whom barely a page of Shakespeare’s play goes by without at least some reference to his skin colour.
According to several opera buffs on my Twitter feed and various Facebook conversations, Verdi though was less interested in Otello’s race. If I’m honest my knowledge of opera is scant but nevertheless the “Moorish general”(as described in the dramatis personae) is first referred to by the piece’s villain Iago as “a thick-lipped savage”who offers ”murky kisses” to Desdemona and the briefest of searches on youtube will find Otello imploring Desdemona to give him her “ivory white hand”. A google image search will instantly bring up a legion of opera singers in garish “blackface” make-up. To separate race from Othello or Otello is surely like separating melancholia from Hamlet. Nothing in drama is impossible but some things are more of a stretch than others.
 
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mediadiversified:

The Tragedy Of Otello: A layperson’s view of racial politics in 21st Century opera

 by Daniel York

The English National Opera have recently announced that the role of Otello in their upcoming production of Verdi’s opera of the same name, which is based on Shakespeare’s Othello, will be played by the renowned Australian tenor, Stuart Skelton. Othello is of course Shakespeare’s famous (and in many ways infamous) “black” character. A “Moorish general”, sometimes described in the text as “tawny” but to whom barely a page of Shakespeare’s play goes by without at least some reference to his skin colour.

According to several opera buffs on my Twitter feed and various Facebook conversations, Verdi though was less interested in Otello’s race. If I’m honest my knowledge of opera is scant but nevertheless the “Moorish general”(as described in the dramatis personae) is first referred to by the piece’s villain Iago as “a thick-lipped savage”who offers ”murky kisses” to Desdemona and the briefest of searches on youtube will find Otello imploring Desdemona to give him her “ivory white hand”. A google image search will instantly bring up a legion of opera singers in garish “blackface” make-up. To separate race from Othello or Otello is surely like separating melancholia from Hamlet. Nothing in drama is impossible but some things are more of a stretch than others.

 

Read More

jacques-audiard:

La Dolce Vita (1960)